Scottsdale Wedding Photographer | Ten Traditional Wedding Details

Are you planning a white wedding and want to use details to ensure it follows a traditional pattern and will bring luck for your future? If so use some of the ten traditions and details below to ensure your future health and fortune. Some are fairly well known and documented but others come from slightly more obscure origins. For example, do you know why the bride always stands to the groom’s left during the wedding ceremony? This was to leave his sword hand free, so allowing him to fight off other suitors! Many of the traditions are based around what the bride and her attendants will wear; others are more about bringing good luck.
Clothing and Flowers.
We are all familiar with the tradition that wearing a white dress symbolises virginity and purity, but did you know that this is a fairly new tradition started by Queen Victoria when she married Prince Albert? Prior to this brides just wore their best dress. The traditional veil is also a symbol of purity, this time combined with modesty. Most brides will choose to carry a bouquet, be it a little posy or a magnificent trailing affair. Again it was the Victorians who began the popularity of red roses as a wedding flower, symbolising true love. The Victorians also began the custom of the bride tossing her bouquet. Originally it meant that the recipient would be safe from evil spirits but over the years has come to mean that the lucky woman who catches the bouquet will be the next to marry. Why do brides wear garters? This is a hangover from medieval Britain when courtiers or attendants would help the bridal couple to undress after their wedding. The bride’s garters were tossed around the chamber and whoever threw the garter that landed on the groom’s nose would be the next man to marry. Choosing their wedding rings is something a bride and groom often like to do together and most couples will opt for fairly traditional designs. The enclosed circle of the ring, of course, symbolises true and eternal love whilst the gold is representative of beauty, purity and strength – hopefully echoing their marriage vows.
Good Luck.
All brides will be familiar with the traditional rhyme ‘something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue’ and there are few brides, however simple or elaborate their wedding, who do not try to emulate this. The something old is for continuity between the generations and will usually be represented by a family heirloom such as a lace handkerchief or a piece of jewellery. It might even be the bride wearing her mother’s wedding gown. The future is covered by something new and is usually the wedding dress or ring. If something is borrowed from a friend who is happily married it will ensure that their happiness rubs off on the new couple. Finally, something blue stands for fidelity, love and good fortune (including a male heir!) and might be in the form of the garter, lingerie or even blue nail varnish for the more adventurous and modern bride. Most brides will choose to have bridesmaids, be they children or adults. Once the vexed question of who or who not to choose has been overcome, it is fairly traditional that they are dressed alike or in a similar fashion. But why do we do this? In the past bridesmaids were dressed identically to the bride simply to confuse evil spirits. In fact, the warding off of evil spirits is a recurring theme in bridal mythology. Some people consider it very unlucky for the bride and groom to see each other on their wedding day; the bride will no longer be pure and new for her groom. This stems from the days of arranged marriages when it was not unusual for the bride and groom to meet for the first time on their wedding day! Nowadays, this is more liberally interpreted with the groom not seeing the bridal gown before the ceremony. All wedding receptions feature a wedding cake. The origins of this cake stem from ancient Roman times when it was a symbol of fertility. Indeed, today, many couples keep the top tier of their cake for the christening ceremony of their first child. Other customs can help bring good luck for the future, such as sewing a small horseshoe into the waistband of a dress or a piece of food sewn into the hem to ensure there will always be food on the table. Choosing which traditional elements to follow is, of course, part of the fun in arranging your wedding.

Samantha Smith is a talented writer. Her main focus for her writing is special events such as weddings and Proms. She blogs for a number of online magazine’s and blogs such as Finishing touch Limo Hire Birmingham. When she is not writing articles she enjoys to travel and see different tourist attractions.

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